At the other end of the country is Geneva, the world’s smallest metropolis. Home to 200,000 inhabitants, it is best known as the birthplace of the International Red Cross as well as the home to 32 international organizations, including the United Nations. The Red Cross museum is particularly impressive with moving displays of humanity in the face of decades of world war.

Geneva also played a pivotal role in the Reformation under the preaching of John Calvin at the Cathédrale St-Pierre. The new International Museum of the Reformation is a modern addition to the city and traces the history of this movement and its influence on modern civilization.

The Rhone River flows into Lake Geneva, creating some beautiful opportunities for walking along the waterfront. At dusk, the city takes on a new look as the sky turns dark blue and the lights of the many shops reflect off of the water. This is the time to stroll along the lakefront, have a meal in one of the many cafes or just people watch.
The Jet d’Eau fountain is a focal point of Lake Geneva. A column of water shoots out of the base at 200 km per hour and rises to an amazing height of 560 feet. At night, lights illuminate this water feature, making it a convenient landmark for finding your way around the city.